New Illinois Traffic Laws For 2020

It is 2020 and several new traffic laws took effect at the beginning of this year. Most significantly, Scott’s Law, a traffic measure to protect police and safety workers, was provided some new tweaks. The original law, also known as the “move over law,” requires drivers to reduce speed and switch lanes to give first-responders on the side of the road more space when their hazard lights are flashing. Due to the tragic deaths of 2 Illinois State Troopers in 2019, the Illinois general assembly made the following changes to Scott’s Law:

-The minimum fine for violating Scott’s Law will increase from $100 to $250 for the first violation, and $750 for the second violation.

-Those who violate Scott’s Law and cause an injury or death will be charged with a Class 4 felony.

-The Scott’s Law Fund will be created to educate motorists on the importance of Scott’s Law. This will be funded by a $250 assessment fee for any violation of Scott’s Law.

-The Illinois Secretary of State will be required to include at least one question about Scott’s Law on the written driving test.

Below are some of the other new traffic laws:

Construction Zone (SB 1496) – Increase the maximum penalty for hitting a construction worker to $25,000 (Currently $10,000).

Vehicle Code-Use of Video Devices (SB 86) – Clarifies that people cannot stream videos on a cell phone while they are driving.

Vehicle Code-Tinted Lights (SB 87) – Bans tinted headlights from being installed on cars.

hot black milf anal – Provides that a person may operate an all-terrain vehicle or recreational off-highway vehicle on a roadway with a speed limit of 55 MPH or less (rather than 35 miles per hour or less).

girls out west video – Raises the mandatory fines for illegally passing a school bus from $150 to $300 for an initial violation and $500 to $1,000 for a future violation.

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured in an free college girls having sex or kim possible fucking videos, then call Chicago personal injury lawyer, Aaron J. Bryant, for a free legal consultation at 312-614-1076.

Illinois Governor Signs New Traffic Bill Strengthening “Scott’s Law”

Back in 2002, Illinois enacted a new traffic bill called “Scott’s Law,” which required drivers to slow down and safely change lanes when they see any vehicle on the side of the road with its hazard lights on. The Bill was named Chicago Fire Department Lt. Scott Gillen, who was killed in 2000. This Bill is often referred to as the “Move Over” law.

In a move to strengthen protections for first responders, Illinois Governor JB Pritzker signed an updated version of this Bill, which now protects protections to include authorized stationary vehicles with oscillating lights, first responders, Illinois Department of Transportation workers, police and anyone authorized to be on the highway for work-related duties.

The new law increases the minimum fine to $250 for a first violation and to $750 for a second and subsequent violations and adds a $250 assessment fee for any violation of Scott’s Law that will be funneled into a new fund devoted to producing driver’s education materials, called the Scott’s Law Fund.

Criminal penalties will increase to a Class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to one year in jail, if a violation results in damage to another car, or a Class 4 felony, punishable by one to three years in prison, if a violation results in an injury or death. Through the new law, an aggravating factor will be added to reckless homicide charges if Scott’s Law is violated.

The secretary of state also must include a written question about Scott’s Law in the driver’s license test. This new law becomes effective immediately.

Changes to Scott’s Law come after three Illinois State Police fatalities have occurred on the side of the road. Two of the three fatalities came as a result of violations of Scott’s Law and the third involved a wrong way driver.

Let’s hope the changes to this law raise awareness for drivers when they see first responders and road workers on the side of the road to slow down and change lanes. These are workers who are in a position to help protect people, but at the same time are in incredibly vulnerable situations while often times standing on the side of a busy highway.

If you or a loved one have been seriously injured in a Chicago traffic accident or Chicago truck accident, then call Chicago personal injury lawyer, Aaron J. Bryant, for a free legal consultation at 312-614-1076