IDOT Releases April Traffic Numbers

Anyone who looks out their windows or gets in their cars and drives around Chicago’s expressways can see that motorist traffic is a fraction of what it was two (2) months ago. The Illinois Department of Transportation (“IDOT”) confirmed what we see everyday as they released April traffic numbers. No surprise, they are way down.

According to IDOT traffic on Chicago area expressways was down anywhere from 29 to 45 percent this April compared with April 2019. IDOT said that on the Kennedy Expressway, the number of work week inbound vehicles dropped from 1.1 million vehicles to 626,000, a 45 percent drop. Statewide traffic is estimated to be down about 37 percent. Illinois Toll Highway Authority said April saw a reduction fo 55 percent in traffic volume, resulting in $52 million less in tolls than expected

For essential workers or those who choose to go into their offices are obviously seeing much faster commute times. According to IDOT the outbound evening rush hour are an average of 21 to 24 minutes faster. 

IDOT to not release any information regarding Illinois traffic accidents for April.

If you or a loved one has been seriously injured in a Chicago car accident or Chicago truck accident, then call Chicago personal injury attorney, Aaron J. Bryant for a free legal consultation.

Chicago’s Traffic Congestion Is Still Terrible

Both the Chicago Tribune and Crain’s reported last week that there are five (5) stretches of roads in the Chicago area that are ranked within the top twenty (2) most congested in the United States.

The results are based on a study conducted by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute called the Urban Mobility Scorecard. No. 4 nationally was I-90/94 westbound from 35th Street to the Edens junction. The eastbound stretch from Montrose Avenue to Ruble Street, just south of Roosevelt Road, ranked No. 7 nationally. No. 14 nationally was the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway (I-90) eastbound starting at the Tri-State Tollway (I-294) and extending to the Kennedy at the Edens (I-94) merge. The study concluded that the Chicago area ranked No. 8 overall for the nation’s worse traffic.

As I have discussed recently on this blog, a portion of the traffic problem (and the increase in Illinois traffic accidents) is that the economy has rebounded and there are more drivers on the road. “The national congestion recession is over,” the report concluded. “The total congestion problem is larger than the pre-recession levels.”

What does this mean for Chicago drivers and their commute times? A driver in the Chicago region who really needs to arrive on time at a destination that is 20 minutes away in light traffic should instead budget a full hour to get there during peak travel times, said Bill Eisele, a senior research engineer at the transportation institute and the report’s co-author.

What is the solution to this gridlock? The authors of this study believe that lawmakers must act aggressively to address the traffic issues before the problems get worse. Experts say possible enhancements include expanding roadway capacity, providing incentives for people to alter their travel times away from the 6 to 10 a.m. and 3 to 7 p.m. peak hours, and expanding public transit and attracting new riders with new services that include new rail lines and bus rapid transit, airport express trains and options directed at luring reverse commuters from their cars to trains and buses.

If you or someone you love has been injured in a Chicago car accident or Chicago truck accident, then call Chicago personal injury lawyer, Aaron Bryant, for a free legal consultation at 312-614-1076.